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street houghton mifflin The Street by Ann Petry. Boston. 1946. Houghton Mifflin. A Literary Fellowship Prize 1st Novel. 436 pages.

 

FROM THE PUBLISHER -

 

   THE STREET tells the poignant, often heartbreaking story of Lutie Johnson, a young black woman, and her spirited struggle to raise her son amid the violence, poverty, and racial dissonance of Harlem in the late 1940s. Originally published in 1946 and hailed by critics as a masterwork, The Street was Ann Petry's first novel, a beloved bestseller with more than a million copies in print. Its haunting tale still resonates today.

 

 

 

 

FROM THE SIGNET PAPERBACK EDITION - 

 

 

 

signet street 710 The unforgettable story of a beautiful woman beset by the passion, sin, and violence of the city. THE STREET - Her first novel, The Street, written while her husband was in the Army, is, she says, a kind of summing up of the things she saw and heard during the six years that she worked and lived in one of America’s largest ghettoes - New York’s Harlem. It won a Houghton Mifflin Literary Fellowship award, and in 1946 was published by that company (which also published her second novel, Country Place, a non-racial account of a New England town during a hurricane). Of The Street said The Survey Graphic: ‘Miss Petry has written a strong and disturbing book. It is a callous reader, indeed, who will not be haunted by it for a long time.’ Born in Old Saybrook, Connecticut, Ann Petry comes from a New England family that has specialized in some branch of chemistry for three generations. If she had not married and gone to live in New York City, she would probably have made pharmacy her life work. Instead she found a variety of jobs in advertising and journalism that would give her an opportunity to write. While interviewing celebrities, covering political rallies and three-alarm fires for a Harlem weekly, reporting on murders and all other forms of sudden death, she acquired an intimate and disturbing knowledge of Harlem and its ancient, evil housing; its tragic, broken families; its high death rate.

 

 

 

 

 

Petry Ann Ann Petry (Ann Lane) was an African American author. Ann Lane was born as the younger of the two daughters to Peter and Bertha Clark in Old Saybrook, Connecticut. Her parents belonged to the Black minority of the small town. Her father was a pharmacist and her mother was a shop owner, chiropodist, and hairdresser. The family belonged to the middle-class, and never had to suffer any financial struggles similar to those of many Harlem inhabitants. The Lane girls were raised sheltered from most of the disadvantages other black people in the United States had to experience due to the color of their skin. Only once did Ann experience racial discrimination when she went to school two years early at the age of 4 with her older sister Helen. On their way home, the two sisters were attacked by some white juveniles with stones. After the girls' uncles took care of this by threatening the wrongdoers the Lane girls were never bothered again. The strong family bonding was a big support for Ann's self-esteem. Her well-traveled uncles, who had many stories to tell their nieces when coming home, her ambitious father who overcame racial obstacles when opening his pharmacy in the small town as well as her mother and aunts, set a great example to Ann and Helen to become strong themselves. Petry interviewed by the Washington Post in 1992 says about her tough female family members that 'it never occurred to them that there were things they couldn't do because they were women. ' The wish to become a professional writer was raised in Ann for the first time in high school when her English teacher read her essay to the class commenting on it with the words: 'I honestly believe that you could be a writer if you wanted to. ' However, Petry decided on a rather stable education and followed the family tradition after finishing high school. She enrolled in college and graduated with a Ph. G. degree from Connecticut College of Pharmacy in New Haven in 1931 and worked in the family business for several years. On February 24, 1938 she married George D. Petry of New Iberia, Louisiana. This new commitment brought Petry to New York and eventually back to writing. She did not only write articles for newspapers like Amsterdam News, or People's Voice, and published short stories in the Crisis, but was also engaged at an elementary school in Harlem. It was during this period of her life that she had realized and personally experienced what the black population of the United States had to go through in their everyday life. Traversing the littered streets of Harlem, living for the first time among large numbers of poor black people, seeing neglected children up close - Petry's early years in New York inevitably made painful impressions on her. Deeply impacted by her Harlem experiences, Ann Petry was in the possession of the necessary creative writing skills to bring it to paper. Her daughter Liz explains to the Washington Post that 'her way of dealing with the problem was to write this book, which maybe was something that people who had grown up in Harlem couldn't do. ' She wrote her most popular novel The Street in 1946 and won the Houghton Mifflin Literary Fellowship. Back in Old Saybrook in 1947, the writer worked on Country Place, The Narrows, and some other stories but they have never achieved the same success as her first book. Until her death Petry lived in a representative 18th century house in her hometown, Old Saybrook. Ann Lane Petry died at the age of 88 on 28th April 1997. She was outlived by her only daughter, Liz Petry.


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