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(03/16/2015) An Anthology of German Poetry from Hölderlin to Rilke in English Translations with German Originals by Angel Flores (editor). Garden City. 1960. Anchor/Doubleday. A Doubleday Anchor Original. 458 pages.. A197. paperback. Cover and typography by Edward Gorey.

 

FROM THE PUBLISHER -

 

   Here, in new translations done especially for this volume, are major and representative works of fourteen leading German lyric poets of the 19th and early 20th centuries. Included in this volume are: Friedrich Hölderlin, Novalis, Clemens Brentano, Joseph von Eichendorff, August Graf von Platen, Annette von Droste-Hülshoff, Heinrich Heine, Nikolaus Lenau, Eduard Mörike, Stefan George, Christian Morgenstern, Hugo von Hofmannsthal, Georg Traki, and Rainer Maria Rilke. The translations, each an independent work in its own right, have been done by such well-known writers as Vernon Watkins, Randall Jarrell, Robert Lowell, Constantine Fitzgibbon, Hugh McDiarmid, Francis Golffing, Peter Viereck, Michael Hamburger, Edwin Morgan, and Herman Salinger. Many of the poems are here translated into English for the first time. The original German text is given immediately below each translation. There are biographical notes on each poet, together with bibliographies giving suggestions for further reading.

 

Angel Flores (1900-1992) was a Puerto Rican author. He received an AB from New York University and a PhD from Cornell University. He passed away in 1992 in Guadalajara, Mexico.

 

 

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