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(04/09/2015) In The Shadow Of Young Girls In Flower by Marcel Proust. New York. 2004. Viking Press. Newly Translated from the French by James Grieve. 558 pages. February 2004. hardcover. Jacket design by Mark Melnick. Originally published in French as A l'ombre des jeunes filles en fleurs. 0670032778.

 

FROM THE PUBLISHER -

 

   Readers and reviewers in the United Kingdom have hailed the new translations of Proust as a major literary event. Soon to appear in the United States, Swann’s Way, along with the second volume of In Search of Lost Time, In the Shadow of Young Girls in Flower, will introduce a new century of American readers to the literary riches of Proust. These superb editions - the first completely new translation of Proust’s novel since the 1920s - bring us a more comic and lucid Proust than English readers have previously been able to enjoy. In the Shadow of Young Girls in Flower is a spectacular dissection of male and female adolescence, charged with the narrator’s memories of Paris and the Normandy seaside. In it, Proust introduces some of his greatest comic inventions. As a meditation on different forms of love, In the Shadow of Young Girls in Flower has no equal.

 

 MARCEL PROUST was born in Auteuil in 1871. In his twenties, following a year in the army, he became a conspicuous society figure, frequenting the most fashionable Paris salons of the day. After 1899, however, his chronic asthma, the death of his parents, and his growing disillusionment with humanity caused him to lead an increasingly retired life. From 1907 on, he rarely emerged from a cork-lined room in his apartment on boulevard Haussmann. There he insulated himself against the distractions of city life and the effects of trees and flowers-though he loved them, they brought on his attacks of asthma. He slept by day and worked by night, writing letters and devoting himself to the completion of In Search of Lost Time. He died in 1922.

 

 

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