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Summer required reading for San Francisco High Schools

 

If you are looking for any of these books check our site!

 

Balboa High School

 

 Balboa High School Summer Reading Assignment

 

Balboa High School English Department, Mr. Gonzalez, Department Head, room 328

 

Each year, Balboa’s students are required to read two works of literature over the summer for their English class the following year. You are to choose ONE book from the grade-level lists below. Then, choose ONE book on your own. This book must appropriate for school, interesting to you, and at your reading skill level. You may choose your second book from the grade-level list if you wish.

 

Grade-level reading lists:

 

Incoming 9th graders / OPTIONAL - Incoming 10th graders

 

Cry the Beloved Country - Paton

Barrio Boy - Galarza

The Odyssey - Homer

Black Boy - Wright

When the Rainbow Goddess Wept - Brainard

Bless Me, Ultima - Anaya

The Aeneid - Virgil

China Boy - Lee

Alice in Wonderland - Carroll

Fallen Angels - Myers

Arrow of God - Achebe

A Gathering of Old Men - Gaines

Aura - Fuentes

The Joy Luck Club - Tan

Dance Hall of the Dead - Hillerman

Julius Caesar - Shakespeare

The Fellowship of the Ring - Tolkien

The Kitchen God’s Wife - Tan

Gulliver’s Travels - Swift

No-no Boy - Okada

The Hobbit - Tolkien

The Piano Lesson - Wilson

The Human Comedy - Saroyan

Skin Deep - Garcia

The Iliad - Homer

Typical American - Jen

The King Must Die - Renault

Wooden Fish Songs - McCunn

Kitchen - Yoshimoto

A Yellow Raft in Blue Water - Dorris

Nectar in a Sieve - Markandaya

China Men - Kingston

The Once and Future King - White

Fifth Chinese Daughter - Wong

A Single Pebble - Hersey

Go Tell it on the Mountain - Baldwin

Walkabout - Marshall

I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings - Angelou

Living Up the Street - Soto

 

11th and 12th grade

 

Balboa High School English Department, Mr. Gonzalez, Department Head, room 328

 

Animal Dreams - Kingsolver

Beloved - Morrison

The Bluest Eye - Morrison

Beowulf - Anonymous

Hiroshima - Hersey

Brave New World - Huxley

House Made of Dawn - Momaday

Brothers Karamazov - Dostoyevsky

Lakota Woman - Crow Dog

Don Quixote - Cervantes

Of Mice and Men - Steinbeck

Siddhartha - Hesse

The Scarlet Letter - Hawthorne

Love in the Time of Cholera - Marquez

Self-Reliance - Emerson

100 Years of Solitude - Marquez

Snow Falling on Cedars - Guterson

A Tale of Two Cities - Dickens

To Kill a Mockingbird - Lee

A Room with a View - Forster

Walden - Thoreau

As You Like It - Shakespeare

Billy Budd - Melville

Antony and Cleopatra - Shakespeare

Catch-22 - Heller

Crime and Punishment - Dostoyevsky

Farewell to Arms - Hemingway

Dr. Zhivago - Pasternak

As I Lay Dying - Faulkner

Henry IV, part 1 & Henry IV, part 2 - Shakespeare

Cannery Row - Steinbeck

King Lear - Shakespeare

The Good Earth - Buck

Bleak House - Dickens

Invisible Man - Ellison

Madame Bovary - Flaubert

My Antonia - Cather

The Cherry Orchard - Chekhov

Native Son - Wright

The Merchant of Venice - Shakespeare

The Natural - Malamud

Oliver Twist - Dickens

Reservation Blues - Alexie

The Plague - Camus

The Sea Wolf - London

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man - Joyce

The Sound and the Fury - Faulkner

Pride and Prejudice - Austen

Tortilla Flat Steinbeck

Richard III - Shakespeare

The Trial - Kafka

War and Peace - Tolstoy

 

 

 

Lowell High School

 

9th grade

 

Otsuka, Julie - When the Emperor was Divine

Rushdie, Salman - Haroun and the Sea of Stories

 

Tenth Grade

 

Kingsolver, Barbara - Bean Trees

McBride, James - The Color of Water

 

Tenth Grade Honors

 

Eugenides,Jeffrey -Middlesex

Russell, Karen - Swamplandia

 

 

Eleventh/Twelfth Grade Electives

 

Eggers, Dave - Zeitoun

Lee, Jennifer 8 - Fortune Cookie Chronicles

 

AP 74  (Ritter) Eleventh grade)

 

McCarthy, Cormac - The Road

Homer - The Iliad (Robert Fagel’s translation)

 

 

AP 75 (Moffitt and Yuan) (Eleventh grade)

 

Diaz, Junot - The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao

Lee, Chang-Rae - Native Speaker

 

AP 80 (Carney) (Twelfth grade)

 

Irving, John - A Prayer for Owen Meany

Sophocles - Oedipus Rex (Oedipus the King)

 

AP 83 (Recht) (Twelfth grade)

 

Homer - The Iliad (Robert Fagel’s translation)

Patchett, Ann - Bel Canto

 

 

 

Abraham Lincoln High School

 

Abraham Lincoln High School Summer Reading Assignments For Students Entering an English Class in August 2012

 

SUMMER READING: The Lincoln High School English teachers expect all students to read one of the novels listed below over the summer. Select a novel for the grade level you are entering. These books are readily available in bookstores and libraries. Please make sure your parent/guardian approves of your choice. What does the “challenge” number mean? The “challenge” level is the Accelerated Reader scoring of the book’s reading level. It rates the vocabulary and syntax. The rating does not relate to the amount of pages or the content.

 

Entering 12th Grade European

 

 Autobiography of a Face – Grealy:  7.4

 Life of Pi – Martel: 7.2

 Never Let Me Go – Ishiguro: 6.0

 Bone - Fae Myenne Ng: : 6.0

 Johnny Got His Gun – Trumbo: 5.9

 

 

Entering 11th Grade American

 

 

Slaughterhouse Five – Vonnegut: 6

 

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime – Haddon: 5.4

 

Chinese Playground – Lee: 5.0

 

For Whom The Bell Tolls – Hemingway: 5.8

 

Room -  Donoghue: 5.5

 

 

Entering 10th Grade Ethnic Literature

 

 

Monster – Myers: 5.1

 

Chinese Cinderella – Mah: 5.7

 

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian – Alexie: 5.5

 

Feed – Anderson: 5.6

 

The Gunslinger – King: 5.3

 

 

Entering 9th Grade World Literature

 

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland - Carroll: 5.7

 

The Hobbit – Tolkien: 6.6

 

A Wrinkle in Time - L’Engle: 4.7

 

The Book Thief – Zusak: 5.1

 

The Little Prince - Saint-Exupery: 5.0

 

 

Assignment: Be prepared for some evaluation of your summer reading when you return to school. We suggest you take some notes while reading your book.

 

What should I take notes on?

 

1. Significant passages: Write down a passage (a few sentences or a paragraph) that helps you understand the book, or that shows the author’s writing style. The passage might give you insight into a character, a conflict, or a theme of the novel. Write the passage down word for word with the page number. Then, write a few sentences explaining why you think the passage is important.

 

2. Plot: Write a summary of the book you read.

 

3. Setting: What are the important locations and times?

 

4. Characterization: List all the characters and describe their personalities. What does the narrator say about the characters? What do characters say about each other? What does each character say and do that helps you understand who they are?

 

5. Conflicts: external conflicts: What are the problems the characters have outside of themselves? Examples of external conflicts are: a fistfight between characters, or struggling against an outside force like poverty. Internal conflicts: What are the conflicts the characters face within themselves? An example of an internal conflict: struggling to make a decision or choice.

 

6. Themes: What are the ideas or messages the plot, setting, characters, and conflicts show? Examples of themes are: money cannot buy happiness, compassion benefits people more than selfishness, or death is inevitable.

 

Ninth Grade World Literature:

 

Ninth graders read a wide range of literature including but not limited to:

 

To Kill A Mockingbird, The Odyssey, Romeo and Juliet, Mythology and You, Lord of the Flies and Animal Farm.

 

We introduce critical reading skills such as annotation, vocabulary development, recognition of literary devices, and analysis of writing style for theme and tone. The basic structure of a paragraph and an essay are taught, and students are expected to learn how to write a personal narrative essay and an analytical, literature based essay. Grammar, usage and mechanics are taught through revision of student writing and direct instruction. Some of the language concepts that we emphasize in ninth grade are: the parts of speech, the rules of punctuation, subject-verb agreement, comma splices and the parts of a sentence.

 

Tenth Grade Ethnic Literature:

 

Tenth graders read a wide range of literature including but not limited to:

 

The Joy Luck Club, Othello, Maus, The Color of Water, Raisin in the Sun, The Jungle, Yellow Raft In Blue Water and Bless Me Ultima.

 

We continue to build upon critical reading skills such as annotation, recognition of literary devices, vocabulary development, and an analysis of writing style for theme, tone, characterization and conflict. Students are expected to write more complex and developed analytical, literature-based essays, as well as expository essays. MLA guidelines are introduced for citation and formatting. Grammar, usage and mechanics are taught through revision of student writing and direct instruction. Some of the language concepts that we emphasize in tenth grade are: syntactical structures, parallel structure, subject-verb agreement, the parts of speech (in more depth), clauses, and pronoun antecedent agreement.

 

Eleventh Grade American Literature:

 

Eleventh graders read a wide range of literature including but not limited to:

 

The Crucible, The Great Gatsby, Of Mice and Men, The Grapes of Wrath, Sula, and The Catcher in the Rye.

 

We continue to build upon critical reading skills such as annotation, close reading, recognition of literary devices, vocabulary development, and an analysis of writing style for theme, tone, characterization, conflict, purpose, context, and audience. Students are expected to write more complex and developed analytical, literature-based essays, expository essays and persuasive essays. MLA guidelines are reinforced for citation and formatting. Grammar, usage and mechanics are taught through revision of student writing and direct instruction. Ninth and tenth grade grammar and usage concepts are reviewed. In addition, new concepts such as active versus passive voice and syntactical variety in student writing are introduced.

 

Twelfth Grade British Literature:

 

 

Twelfth graders read a wide range of literature including but not limited to:

 

Frankenstein, Wuthering Heights, Antigone, Plato’s Allegory of the Cave, Hamlet, Macbeth, Crime and Punishment and The Stranger.

 

We continue to build upon critical reading skills such as annotation, close reading, recognition of literary devices, vocabulary development, and an analysis of writing style for theme, tone, characterization, conflict, purpose, context, and audience. Students are expected to write more complex and developed analytical, literature-based essays, expository essays and persuasive essays. Students are also expected to write a personal statement in preparation for college applications. MLA guidelines are reinforced for citation and formatting. Grammar, usage and mechanics are taught through revision of student writing and direct instruction. All grammar and usage concepts are reviewed and assessed.

 

Tenth Grade Accelerated English:
 

10th Grade Accelerated English is designed to introduce themes of both American and world literature at an advanced level. The class will provide a forum for students interested in developing reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills with the expectations of a first-year university course in mind. The focus of the class is the ongoing discussion of the themes and structures of social commentary as it is found and expressed in literature. This class will be rigorous and fast-paced, and students will be expected to accurately complete regular reading comprehension, creative writing, grammar, and vocabulary assignments including test preparation for the English AP exam, speeches, and essays. Please note: while UC/CSU may not recognize additional course credit for 9th or 10th accelerated classes on transcripts, accelerated courses are often acknowledged by other colleges.

 

Eleventh Grade Honors American Literature:

 

This course uses canonical American texts to chronologically explore the development of America as a nation, an identity and an idea. We investigate themes such as: the importance of self-reliance, action versus inaction, and having the courage of one’s convictions. Semester one follows early American history and we read authors such as Miller, Emerson, Jefferson, Thoreau and Twain. In semester two, American issues of modernity such as alienation versus connection, industrialization, greed, and compassion are explored through authors such as Steinbeck, Fitzgerald, and Salinger. We learn how to read texts not just for meaning, but to deconstruct how a text creates meaning through stylistic choices and rhetoric. Additionally, students will begin to purposefully utilize elevated stylistic devices for effect in their own writing. The Language and Composition AP exam is optional with this course.

 

Twelfth Grade AP English Literature:

 

In this course, students will read a number of classic works reflective of the European and American Literature canon. Shakespeare, Dostoyevsky, Austen, Ellison and other writers and poets offer striking insights into such universal themes as identity, alienation, power, and community. We will explore the ways that the art and literature in Europe and the United States were both reflective and prophetic about the way people saw and understood the world in which they lived. We will try to use these texts as lenses through which we can make sense of the United States at the beginning of a new millennium and in the middle of our postmodern age (the proliferation of technology, consumerism, psychoanalysis, 9/11, globalization). Concurrently, students will learn to move beyond simple comprehension of a text to an understanding of writing as craft (analyzing structure, style and themes), and will incorporate these techniques into their own expository and interpretative essays. This course meets all the curricular requirements as described in the AP English Course Description guide and has been approved by the Advanced Placement College Board.

 

 

 

George Washington High School

 

 George Washington High School

2012 Summer Reading List

 

All Washington High School students are asked to complete a summer reading assignment.  How you will be assessed is at the discretion of next year’s English teacher; assessment may come in the form of a multiple choice or true/false quiz, short answer questions, journal assignment, and/or an essay. 

 

Regular studentschoose ONE novel from the relevant grade-level list. Although regular students are not required to do the journal assignment, most English teachers will give extra credit if you decide to do it.  Honors and AP students must read TWO novels and they must complete the journal assignment for each book described on the backside of this handout.

 

Class of 2015—Current Freshmen or Rising Sophomores

 

  • Like Water for Chocolate(1989) by Laura Esquivel. The youngest daughter of a well-born Mexican rancher, when Tita falls in love her mother quickly attempts to end the liaison.
  • Fifth Chinese Daughter(1950) by Jade Snow Wong. Jade Snow Wong becomes determined to go to college and gain more independence than she has been taught to expect.
  • Tears of a Tiger(1996) by Sharon Draper.  Andy, a young black man, cannot bear his guilt or reach out for help after killing his friend in a drunk-driving accident.
  • The Big Thirst(2011) by Charles Fishman. This non-fiction book looks at the growing crisis of the availability of safe and plentiful drinking water, which was once cheap but is becoming a scarce and priceless resource.
  • Rule of the Bone(1995) by Russell Banks. A homeless, teenage dropout selling small-load boom to the locals. A modern working class Holden Caulfield from Catcher in the Rye.

 

Class of 2014—Current Sophomores or Rising Juniors

  • A Tree Grows in Brooklyn(1943) by Betty Smith. The young, sensitive, and idealistic Francie Nolan falls in love.  Set if the poverty-stricken tenement district for new immigrants in the Brooklyn slums.  The novel spans the life of Francie from age 11 to 17.
  • The Color of Water: A Black Man’s Tribute to His White Mother(1996) by James McBride.

After becoming pregnant by her black boyfriend, Ruth’s immigrant, Polish, Jewish (and very prejudiced) family disowns her. She moves to Harlem, meets another man, falls in love, marries, and has 8 children.

  • This Boy’s Life(1989) by Tobias Wolff.  Wolff recounts his childhood, adolescence, and tumultuous life growing up with his mother and stepfather.
  • In Cold Blood (1966) by Truman Copote.  In journalistic style, this non-fiction novel details the brutal 1959 murders of a wealthy family in the rural, small town of Holcomb, Kansas.
  • Their Eyes Were Watching God(1937) by Zora Neale Hurston. A young, African-American, teenager from the South, Janie develops from an innocent young girl to a confident, assertive, wise woman.  Written in the rich vernacular of Black English.

 

Class of 2013—Current Juniors or Rising Seniors

  • All Quiet on the Western Front(1929) by Erich M. Remarque.  Paul Baumer, a young man of nineteen, fights in the German army on the French front in World War I.  After ten weeks of strenuous training and the unimaginable brutality of life on the front, he no longer believes that war is glorious or honorable; instead, he lives in constant physical terror.
  • Love in the Time of Cholera(1985) by Gabriel Garcia Marquez.  Although Fermina may think she has erased Florentino from her memory, he has not stopped thinking of her long after their love affair ends.  Can they rekindle their romance at 70?
  • Emma(1815) by Jane Austen.  Emma, described by the author as handsome, clever, and rich, is also a spoiled brat who meddles in the lives of others while trying to play matchmaker.
  • Pride and Prejudice(1813) by Jane Austen. Elizabeth, the second eldest of five and daughter of a landed English gentleman, navigates the perils of manners, love, and marriage in the aristocratic society of the early 1800s.
  • Portrait of a Lady(1881) by Henry James.  Inheriting a substantial amount of money, Isabel Archer, a spirited young American, falls prey to two scheming expatriates.  Largely set in Europe, the novel explores the Old and New World, freedom, responsibility, and sexuality.

 

Reading Journal Assignment

 

Honors and AP is designed to challenge students beyond basic grade-level standards. Hence, you are required to read TWO of the titles listed in your grade-level, and to keep a reading journal.* When you return to school in the Fall, you will turn in your reading journal, and you will be given an assessment on the two books you have read.

 

[Note:  Although the journal is not required of regular students, most teachers will acknowledge your work and give extra credit should you decide to do the journal assignment.]

 

Objective:

 This journal assignment is fostered to develop the analytical, reading, and writing skills you will need for college as well as for life in general.  The stronger a reader and writer you are, the better prepared you will be to pursue, to defend, and to voice your own beliefs, and the better prepared you will be to consider critically those of others. Moreover, reading quality literature allows for the exploration of various themes, perspectives, and experiences, and allows for a clearer sense of what constitutes good writing and good thinking.  For these reasons, we created the summer reading program to foster no only a milieu for quality reading over the summer months, but also a greater appreciation for the value of reading itself. 

 

 

Reading Journal:

Record your questions, observations, and interpretations as you read each novel.  Your comments should always be specific to the work.  That is, your journal is not a place for you to explore your own personal life (i.e. no autobiographical writing).  However, you will use your own experiences and collected knowledge to help you arrive at an understanding of the various elements in a work of literature.  Strong readers do this automatically, for this active reading allows you to review the work’s literal aspects (e.g. biographical facts on the author; historical facts pertinent to the work; lists of characters; setting; plot summary) as well as its more complex and figurative elements (e.g. themes; reasons for a character’s behavior, thoughts, and feelings; meaning of symbols and metaphors; irony; paradox; conflict; analytical questions and responses.)

 

Remember that reviewing the literal aspects of the novel is only to help you arrive at a more profound understanding of the various complex, figurative elements of the work.  Hence, your reading journal should be much less literal review, and much more interpretive reflection supported by specifics from the novel.  We study the works of these authors because they brilliantly and eloquently say what few of us have the talent to! Hence, give yourself the time to understand and to appreciate their artistry.  Otherwise, you will most likely interpret the work superficially.

 

Length

Your journal should reflect the ongoing dialogue you have with your book.  Although you should get into the habit of writing every time you read, that is not necessary.  As a general rule of thumb, divide your novel into 15-20 sections.  Record a page or two of writing for each section.  Sprinkle your writing with specific references from the novels and remember to jot the page number for future reference.  Good analytical writing is peppered with quotes from the text.  Date your journal every time you write.

 

*Once the semester begins, you may NOT transfer out of your registered class simply because you did not do the reading assignment.

 

 

 

School of the Arts (SOTA)

 

 9th Grade English (World Literature)

 Required Summer Reading for Students Entering This Class

 All students must read J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Hobbit as well as one of the books listed below. The Hobbit will form the course’s first unit of study, so it is imperative that you read this book with care. For each book you read, do the At-Home Summer Reading Assignment described on the other side of this sheet.

 These assignments will be collected on the first day of class, but you will be able to use them during the first week of school to write an in-class essay based on your summer reading.

 

Maya Angelou I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings

Olivia Butler Parable of the Sower

Orson Scott Card Ender's Game

Clifford Chase, ed. Queer Thirteen

Daphne du Maurier Rebecca

Laura Esquivel Like Water for Chocolate

Ernesto Galarza Barrio Boy

Robert Heinlein Stranger in a Strange Land

John Hersey A Single Pebble

Joy Kogawa Obasan

Ursula LeGuin Wizard of Earthsea

Mary Renault The King Must Die

Molyda Szymusiak The Stones Cry Out: A Cambodian Childhood

Evelyn Waugh The Loved One

T.H. White The Sword in the Stone

Banana Yoshimoto Kitchen

 

9th Grade Honors English (World Literature)

 Required Summer Reading for Students Admitted to This Class

 All students must read both George Orwell’s Animal Farm AND Karl Marx’s Communist Manifesto as well as one of the books listed below. Animal Farm and the Communist Manifesto will form the course’s first unit of study, so it is imperative that you read these books with care. For Animal Farm and your book of choice, do the At-Home Summer Reading Assignment described on page two of this handout. The Communist Manifesto assignment is given below. All these assignments will be collected on the first day of class, but you will be able to use them during the first week of school to write an in-class essay based on your summer reading.

 Drama:

 George Bernard Shaw Arms and the Man AND The Devil’s Disciple

William Shakespeare Twelfth Night AND Midsummer Night’s Dream

John Millington Synge The Playboy of the Western World AND Brian Friel,

Translation

Oscar Wilde The Importance of Being Earnest AND Lady Windermere’s Fan

 Novels:

 Jane Austen Pride and Prejudice

Octavia Butler Parable of the Sower OR Dawn

Mai-Lee Chai My Lucky Face.

Charles Dickens David Copperfield

Alexandre Dumas The Three Musketeers OR The Count of Monte Cristo

Graham Greene The Quiet American

Dashiell Hammett The Glass Key

Ursula LeGuin The Left Hand of Darkness

Gabriel Garcia Marquez One Hundred Years of Solitude OR Of Love and Other Demons

Kyoto Mori Shizuko’s Daughter

George Orwell Down and Out in Paris and London

Manuel Puig Betrayed by Rita Hayworth

Tom Robbins Jitterbug Perfume

Marilyn Robinson Housekeeping

Robert Louis Stevenson Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde AND Herman Melville, Typee

Nathaniel West The Day of the Locust

 

 10th Grade English 2012-2013

 Required Summer Reading

 All students must read Paul Coehlho’s The Alchemist as well as one of the books listed below. The Alchemist will form the course’s first unit of study, so it is imperative that you read this book with care. In preparation for the essay you will write during the first week of school, you must underline important and interesting passages in both books and make frequent, copious marginal notes in The Alchemist as well as you book of choice. Look for important social and historical ideas and connections as well as how the author uses language to develop theme, character, and plot. Use large post-it notes for anything you cannot fit into the margins of the book. (If you must get the book from a library, use numerous post-it-notes for all your annotations and comments.

 

Amy Tan The Kitchen God's Wife

Monica Ital Sone Nisei Daughter

Fae Myenne Ng Bone

Nien Cheng Life and Death in Shanghai

Loung Ung First They Killed My Father

John Elray Khalifah: A Novel of Conquest and Personal Triumph

James McBride The Color of Water

John Griffin Black Like Me

Mark Mathabane Kaffir Boy

Amiri Baraka The Dutchman AND The Slave (two plays—read both)

Charles Johnson The Middle Passage

Isabel Allende The Infinite Plan

Julia Alvarez How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents

Sandra Cisneros Caramelo

Loida Perez Geographies of Home

Mario Vargas Llosa Aunt Julia and the Scriptwriter

Cristina Garcia The Aguero Sisters

Chaim Potok My Name is Asher Lev

Barbara Kingsolver Pigs in Heaven

Susan Power The Grass Dancer

Louise Erdrich Love Medicine

Bharati Mukerjee Desirable Daughters

 

 10th Grade Honors English 2012-2013

 Required Summer Reading

 All students must read Jesmyn Ward’s Salvage the Bones as well as one of the books listed below. Salvage the Bones will form the course’s first unit of study, so it is imperative that you read this book with care. In preparation for the essay you will write during the first week of school, you must underline important and interesting passages and make frequent, copious marginal notes in Salvage the Bones as well as you book of choice. Look for important social and historical ideas and connections as well as how the author uses language to develop theme, character, and plot. Use large post-it notes for anything you cannot fit into the margins of the book. (If you must get the book from a library, use numerous post-it-notes for all your annotations and comments.)

 

Nadine Gordimer Burger’s Daughter (South Africa)

Gish Jen Typical American (Japan)

Arundhati Roy The God of Small Things (India)

Jumpta Lahiri The Namesake (India)

Leon Uris The Haj (Middle East)

Ernest Gaines A Lesson Before Dying (African American)

James Baldwin Another Country (African American)

Keri Hulme The Bone People (Maori—New Zealand)

Gabriel Garcia Marquez Love in the Time of Cholera (South America)

Sherman Alexie Reservation Blues (Native American)

Louise Erdrich Love Medicine (Native American)

Kalid Hosseini Kite Runner (Afghanistan)

Lisa See Snow Flower and the Secret Fan (China)

Jan Wong Red China Blues (China)

Orhan Pamuk The White Castle (Turkey)

Edwidge Danticat Breath, Eyes, Memory (Haiti)

 

 11th Grade English

 Required Summer Reading 2012-13

 All students must read F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby as well as one of the books listed below. The Great Gatsby will form the course’s first major unit of study, so it is imperative that you read this book with care. If possible, you should buy both books. In preparation for the essay you will write during the first week of school, you must underline important and interesting passages in both books and make frequent, copious marginal notes. Look for important social and historical ideas and connections as well as how the author uses language to develop theme, character, and plot. Use large post-it notes for anything you cannot fit into the margins of the book. (If you must get the book from a library, use numerous post-it-notes for all your annotations and comments.)

 

Henry James Daisy Miller

Willa Cather Death Comes for the Archbishop

Ernest Gaines The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman

Joseph Heller Catch 22

Ernest Hemingway A Farewell to Arms

Upton Sinclair The Jungle

Kurt Vonnegut Slaughterhouse Five OR Mother Night

Tom Wolfe Look Homeward, Angel

Mark Twain Huckleberry Finn

Pearl Buck The Good Earth

Sinclair Lewis Babbitt OR Main Street

Raymond Chandler The Big Sleep and Farewell My Lovely

Dashiell Hammett The Dain Curse OR The Maltese Falcon

Tennessee Williams A Streetcar Named Desire AND Glass Menagerie (read both)

Mario Vargas Llosa Aunt Julia and the Scriptwriter

Robert Kaplan Warrior Politics: Why Leadership Demands a pagan Ethos OR The Arabists: The Romance of an

American Elite

Franklin Foer How Soccer Explains the World: An Unlikely Theory of Globalization

Jonathan Kozol Savage Inequities

Somerset Maugham The Painted Veil

Charlotte Bronte Jane Eyre

Giuseppe di Lampedusa The Leopard

Matthew B. Crawford Shop Class as Soulcraft: An Inquiry Into the Value of Work

 

 11th Grade Honors English (American Literature)

 Required Summer Reading 2012-13

 All students must read Jack Kerouac’s On the Road as well as one of the books listed below. On the Road will form the course’s first major unit of study, so it is imperative that you read this book with care. If possible, you

should buy both books. In preparation for the essay you will write during the first week of school, you must underline important and interesting passages in both books and make frequent, copious marginal notes. Look for important social and historical ideas and connections as well as how the author uses language to develop theme, character, and plot. Use large post-it notes for anything you cannot fit into the margins of the book. (If you must get the book from a library, use numerous post-it-notes for all your annotations and comments.)

 

 Edward Abbey The Monkey Wrench Gang

Sherman Alexie Reservation Blues

James Baldwin Another Country

Russell Banks Rule of the Bone OR Cloudsplitter

Saul Bellow Henderson the Rain King

Pearl Buck The Good Earth

Olive Burns Cold Sassy Tree

Truman Capote In Cold Blood

Nella Carsen Quicksand

Willa Cather The Professor’s House OR My Antonia

Jeff Chang Can’t Stop, Won’t Stop: A History of Hip-Hop

E.L. Doctorow Ragtime OR The March

Dave Eggers A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius

William Faulkner Sanctuary

Alex Haley Roots OR The Autobiography of Malcolm X

Zora Neale Hurston Their Eyes Were Watching God

Jonathan Kozol Savage Inequities

Carson McCullers The Heart is a Lonely Hunter

Claude McKay Banana Bottom OR Home to Harlem

Arthur Miller Death of a Salesman AND All My Sons (read both)

Tim O'Brien The Things They Carried OR Going After Cacciato (both)

Tom Robbins Even Cowgirls Get the Blues OR Skinny Legs and All

Jim Thompson The Killer Inside Me AND The Grifters (read both)

Jean Toomer Cane

Kurt Vonnegut Mother Night OR The Sirens of Titan

Dorothy West The Wedding

Thornton Wilder Skin of Our Teeth AND Our Town (read both)

Tennessee Williams A Streetcar Named Desire AND Glass Menagerie (both)

August Wilson Fences AND The Piano Lesson (read both)

Tom Wolfe Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test

 

11th Grade AP Language and Composition

 Required Summer Reading 2012-13

 All students must read John Steinbeck’s East of Eden as well as one of the books listed below. East of Eden will form the course’s first major unit of study, so it is imperative that you read this book with care. If possible, you should buy both books. In preparation for the essay you will write during the first week of school, you must underline important and interesting passages in both books and make frequent, copious marginal notes. Look for important social and historical ideas and connections as well as how the author uses language to develop theme, character, and plot. Use large post-it notes for anything you cannot fit into the margins of the book. (If you must get the book from a library, use numerous post-it-notes for all your annotations and comments.)

 

Feel like overachieving? Better yet, just like to read? Reading all or any of the books in this box will help you out in this course second semester

 

Henry James The Americans /Washington Square/ Daisy Miller

F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby

Vladimir Nabokov Lolita/ Invitation to a Beheading

Jane Austen Pride and Prejudice

Sinclair Lewis Babbitt OR Main Street

Carson McCullers The Heart is a Lonely Hunter

Mike Rose Lives on the Boundary

Kurt Vonnegut Mother Night OR The Sirens of Titan

Edith Wharton The House of Mirth

Tennessee Williams A Streetcar Named Desire AND Glass Menagerie (read both)

August Wilson Fences AND The Piano Lesson (read both)

Robert Kaplan Warrior Politics: Why Leadership Demands a pagan Ethos OR The Arabists: The Romance of an

American Elite

Martin Meredith The Fate of Africa: A History of Fifty Years of Independence

Dorothy Sayers Whose Body? OR Busman’s Honeymoon

Mario Vargas Llosa Aunt Julia and the Scriptwriter

Franklin Foer How Soccer Explains the World: An Unlikely Theory of Globalization

Malcom Gladwell The Tipping Point: How Little Things can Make a Big Difference OR Blink

Raymond Chandler The Big Sleep and Farewell My Lovely

Dashiell Hammett The Dain Curse OR The Maltese Falcon

James Baldwin Another Country AND Blues for Mister Charlie (read both)

Pearl Buck The Good Earth

Willa Cather The Professor’s House

Michael Herr Dispatches

Ernest Hemingway The Sun Also Rises

 

 12th Grade English (English/European Literature)

 

Required Summer Reading for Students Entering This Class

 All students must read Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein as well as one of the books listed below. Frankenstein will form the course’s first major unit of study, so it is imperative that you read this book with care. If possible, you should buy both books. In preparation for the essay you will write during the first week of school, you must underline important and interesting passages in both books and make frequent, copious marginal notes. Look for important social and historical ideas and connections as well as how the author uses language to develop theme, character, and plot. Use large post-it notes for anything you cannot fit into the margins of the book. (If you must get the book from a library, use numerous post-it-notes for all your annotations and comments.)

 

Julia Alvarez In the Time of Butterflies

Albert Camus The Fall OR The Plague

Anton Chekhov Uncle Vanya AND The Cherry Orchard (read both)

J.M. Coetzee Disgrace OR Waiting for the Barbarians

Anita Desai The Clear Light of Day

Charles Dickens Any Dickens EXCEPT Tale of Two Cities or Great

Expectations

Arthur Conan Doyle Hound of the Baskervilles AND A Study in Scarlet (both)

John Gardiner Grendel

F. Scott Fitzgerald Tender is the Night

Graham Greene The Power and the Glory OR Brighton Rock OR Our Man

in Havana

C.S. Forester The African Queen

Jerzy Kozinsky Being There

Federigo Garcia Lorca Three Plays (Blood Wedding, the House of Bernarda Alba,

and Yerma--choose any two of these plays)

Somerset Maugham The Razor's Edge

Jean-Baptiste Moliere Tartuffe AND The Miser (two plays—read both)

Vladimir Nabokov Pnin

William Shakespeare As You Like It AND Two Gentlemen of Verona (read both)

Alexander Solzhenitsyn One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich

 

 12th Grade AP English Literature

 Required Summer Reading 2012-13

 All students must read Genesis, Exodus, Matthew, and John from the King James version of the Bible as well as Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein AND Milan Kundera’s The Unbearable Lightness of Being. These three works will form the course’s first major unit of study, so it is imperative that you read and annotate them with care and (complete the attached biblical allusions assignment.) In addition, you should, if possible, buy all three books you choose from the following lists. In preparation for the essay you will write during the first week of school, you must underline important and interesting passages in all the reading selections and make frequent, copious marginal notes. Look for the important social and historical ideas and connections as well as how the author uses language to develop theme, character, and plot. Use large post-it notes for anything you cannot fit into the margins of the book. (If you must get the book from a library, use numerous post-it-notes for all your annotations and comments.)

 

 AP English Literature: Biblical Allusions Summer

 Reading Assignment Test

 Research and define the following allusions. You must use your King James Bible and discover the meanings in context; then you may do additional research on the internet. Your definitions must include context: who said or did it, what was the event, where did it take place and why was it important. Type your responses, and include title, book name, and verse/chapter numbers.

 

1.) “The Creation” Genesis 1

“The Fall” Genesis 3

“The Flood” Genesis 6

The Mark of Cain Genesis 4-6

The Tower of Babel Genesis 11:1-9

Sodom and Gomorrah Genesis 18

Lot and his wife Genesis 19

The Ten Commandments Exodus 20:1-17

David and Goliath I Samuel 17

8.) The Nativity Matthew 1, Luke 2

9.) The Sermon on the Mount Matthew 5:3 - 7:27, Luke 6:17-49

10.) Lazarus John 11:1-12:11

11.) The Last Supper Mark 14, John 13

12.) The Garden of Gethsemane Matthew 26

13.) The Betrayal Matthew 25, 26

14.) “The Denial” Matthew 26, Mark 14, Luke 22, John 18

15.) Thirty pieces of silver Matthew 26, 27; Mark 14, Luke 22, John 13, 18

16.) Golgotha Matthew 27:33, Mark 15:22, John 19:17

17.) The Crucifixion Matthew 27, Mark 15, Luke 23, John 19

18.) The Resurrection Luke 24; John 20, 21

19.) The Holy Spirit Acts 1, 2

 

 

 

 

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0316098442The Return of Little Big Man by Thomas Berger. Boston. 1999. Little Brown.  432 pages. Jacket design by Leslie Goldman. 0316098442. 

FROM THE PUBLISHER –

In 1964, LITTLE BIG MAN gave us the reminiscences of Jack Crabb - a white orphan raised among the Cheyenne - who returns to ‘civilized’ society, where (among other things) he tangles with Wyatt Earp and Wild Bill Hickok, and ends up as the only white survivor of Custer’s Last Stand Now in The Return of Little Big Man, the sequel to that bestselling literary classic, Jack Crabb, the foremost chronicler of the American West, continues his fabulous adventures. At the end of LITTLE BIG MAN, Jack’s supposed death at age 111 cut short his tale. A Newly discovered manuscript, however, reveals that Jack had faked his death to get out Of his publishing contract, and he now picks up the story of his extraordinary action-packed life. Back in the saddle again, Jack gives a blow-by-blow eyewitness account of the assassination of Wild Bill Hickok, and reveals what really happened at the O.K. Corral. He meets, shoots, drinks, and rides with Bat Masterson, Annie Oakley, Doc Holliday, and dozens of ordinary Western folk: teachers, bargirls, saloon owners, cowboys, trappers, and gunslingers. Jack even travels to Europe with Buffalo Bill Cody in his Wild West show, where he is embraced by Queen Victoria and the Prince of Wales. And in a gut-wrenching final, Jack witnesses the murder of one of America’s greatest heroes – Sitting Bull. As in LITTLE BIG MAN, Thomas Berger’s meticulous research enriches his story with authenticity and historical accuracy. THE RETURN OF LITTLE BIG MAN is an astonishing literary achievement and a rollicking good read.

Berger Thomas

Born July 20, 1924

Thomas Louis Berger (July 20, 1924 – July 13, 2014) was an American novelist. Probably best known for his picaresque novel Little Big Man and the subsequent film by Arthur Penn, Berger explored and manipulated many genres of fiction throughout his career, including the crime novel, the hard-boiled detective story, science fiction, the utopian novel, plus re-workings of classical mythology, Arthurian legend, and the survival adventure. Berger's biting wit led many reviewers to refer to him as a satirist or "comic" novelist, descriptions he preferred to reject. His admirers often bemoaned that his talent and achievement were under-appreciated, in view of his versatility across many forms of fiction, his precise use of language, and his probing intelligence. Born in Cincinnati, Ohio, Thomas Berger grew up in the nearby community of Lockland. He interrupted his college career to enlist in the United States Army in 1943. Berger served in Europe, and was stationed with a medical unit in the first U.S. Occupation Forces in Berlin, experiences which later provided him with background for his first novel, Crazy in Berlin, published in 1958. On his return, he studied at the University of Cincinnati, receiving a B.A. in 1948. He then pursued graduate work in English at Columbia University, leaving his thesis unfinished to enroll in the writers workshop at the New School for Social Research. Here Berger met and married an artist, Jeanne Redpath, in 1950. He supported himself during this time by working as a librarian at the Rand School of Social Science, and was briefly on staff at the New York Times Index. Berger later became a copy editor at Popular Science Monthly, and performed free-lance editing during the early years of his writing career. Eventually, Berger was able to devote himself to writing full-time, particularly after the notoriety gained by his third book, Little Big Man, in 1964. Although he would occasionally put his hand to a short story, a play, or non-fiction article (including a stint as film critic for Esquire), Berger preferred the long narrative form of the novel, and produced a steady run of critically acclaimed books throughout his career. In 1984 his book The Feud was nominated by the Pulitzer committee for fiction for the Pulitzer Prize, but the Pulitzer board overrode their recommendation and instead chose William Kennedy's Ironweed. In 1974, Berger was a writer in residence at the University of Kansas, and a Distinguished Visiting Professor at Southampton College, in 1975–76. He lectured at Yale University in 1981 and 1982, and was a Regents' Lecturer at the University of California, Davis, in 1982. A collection of his papers is available at the Howard Gotlieb Archival Research Center, Boston University. Berger resided in New York City from 1948 to 1953, and lived the next twelve years in a town on the Hudson River. In subsequent years, he lived in London, Malibu, California, New York City again, Long Island, and then Mount Desert Island in Maine, before once more returning to the banks of the Hudson. He died on July 13, 2014, seven days before his 90th birthday.

 


 

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Neglectedbooks.com

The Neglected Books Page

13 December 2018

www.NeglectedBooks.com: Where forgotten books are remembered
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    “It was my father’s strange conceit to write me a letter, the writing of which extended over a period of more than thirty years, and which, ultimately, reached ten thousand pages in length, a total of over two and a half million words,” Page Smith writes in his introduction to this book, which should be... Read more

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