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Democracy Now!

Democracy Now!

Democracy Now! is an independent daily TV & radio news program, hosted by award-winning journalists Amy Goodman and Juan González. We provide daily global news headlines, in-depth interviews and investigative reports without any advertisements or government funding. Our programming shines a spotlight on corporate and government abuses of power and lifts up the stories of ordinary people working to make change in extraordinary times. Democracy Now! is live weekdays at 8am ET and available 24/7 through our website and podcasts.

Words Without Borders

Words Without Borders

Words Without Borders:The Online Magazine of International Literature
  • Magdalena Mullek & Julia Sherwood Shine a Spotlight on Slovak Fiction

    Magdalena Mullek and Julia Sherwood are the editors and translators of the recently released anthology of contemporary Slovak fiction Into the Spotlight. They spoke with WWB about the anthology’s

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  • On Translating Yolanda Reyes’s “Bobotá”

    Susannah Greenblatt’s translation of “Bobotá,” an excerpt from Yolanda Reyes’s novel Qué raro que me llame Federico, appears in the September 2017 issue: A

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  • The Watchlist: September 2017

    Every month, emeritus Words Without Borders reviews editor M. Bartley Seigel reaches out into the wide world from his home on the shores of Lake Superior in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula to

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  • An Interview with Motoyuki Shibata

    We sat down with Japanese translator and editor Motoyuki Shibata, cofounder (with Ted Goossen) and editor in chief of the literary magazine Monkey Business, which brings new writing from Japan into English

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  • Our Guide to the 2017 Brooklyn Book Festival & Bookend Events

    The Brooklyn Book Festival is this Sunday, with a stellar lineup of literary conversations, preceded by exciting Bookend events all this week, beginning with tonight’s kickoff party. On Thursday,

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  • On Translating Melba Escobar’s “House of Beauty”

    Elizabeth Bryer’s translation of Melba Escobar’s House of Beauty is forthcoming from 4th Estate in March 2018. An excerpt of her translation appeared in the September 2017 issue of Words Without

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  • Celebrate with WWB on November 1st!

    Tickets are now on sale for the 2017 Words Without Borders Gala. Hosted by Maaza Mengiste with honorary chair Ian Buruma, the gala will be held Wednesday, November 1 at  Tribeca Three

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  • Meet the Writers Hosting the 2017 WWB Gala!

    Masha Gessen, Osama Alomar, Uzodinma Iweala, and Idra Novey are just a few of the 27 outstanding writers and translators who will join us for our annual celebration this November, chaired by James H. Ottaway,

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  • The City and the Writer—In Monrovia, Liberia with Wayétu Moore

    If each city is like a game of chess, the day when I have learned the rules, I shall finally possess my empire, even if I shall never succeed in knowing all the cities it contains. —Italo Calvino, Invisible

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New York Review of Books

The New York Review of Books

Recent items from nybooks.com
  • Nuclear Apocalypse Now?
    The most telling aspect of Trump’s UN speech was, after threatening to “totally destroy North Korea,” his calling the possibility of nuclear conflict “unthinkable.” On the contrary, we must think about it. And crucial to any understanding of the...
  • Splendid Isolation
    Christopher Nolan’s epic movie about the rescue of the British army from the beaches of northeastern France in May 1940 has become a worldwide box office success. This is splendid news for its makers, and can do no harm to American, Taiwanese, or...
  • John Ashbery (1927–2017)
    Ashbery’s style was marked above all by a calm, discursive voice, going along at a walking pace, often seeming to have been caught in midstream, maybe half-heard from outside through the curtains. That voice could occasionally sound explicitly...
  • Ruth Asawa: Tending the Metal Garden
    When the Black Mountain College artist Ruth Asawa debuted her wire sculptures in New York in the Fifties, critics dismissed them as decorative or housewifely. Yet the universal implications of Asawa’s work are owed to the particularities of her...
  • Impeachment?
    To the Editors: In “What Are Impeachable Offenses?” Noah Feldman and Jacob Weisberg present a scholarly review of Article II, Section 4 of the Constitution of the United States. They claim that a self-pardon, “would be ineffectual because no...
  • Dealing with the Enemy
    To the Editors: Jessica Mathews’s thoughtful review of my book Losing an Enemy: Obama, Iran, and the Triumph of Diplomacyprovides excellent insights into the complexities of dealing with Iran and North Korea. Our one area of...
  • John Berryman’s Letters
    To the Editors: We are currently coediting a volume of John Berryman’s literary correspondence. We believe some of your readers may possess unpublished letters from the poet, and we would like to consider these for inclusion in our volume....
  • When Dissent Became Treason
    As our newspapers and TV screens overflow with choleric attacks by President Trump on the media, immigrants, and anyone who criticizes him, it makes us wonder: What would it be like if nothing restrained him from his obvious wish to silence,...
  • The Passport of Whiteness
    Everyone knows we are a nation of immigrants, that immigrants are good for the economy, and that freedom seekers are our kin. What I find sad is that we all know this history. We did not think the ideal of liberal democracy, the open society, would...

Neglectedbooks.com

The Neglected Books Page

www.NeglectedBooks.com: Where forgotten books are remembered
  • Vertical and Horizontal, by Lillian Ross (1963)

    Lillian Ross’s death at the venerable age of 99 has been widely noted, starting with Rebecca Mead’s obituary in Ross’s beloved The New Yorker. A number of her more successful books, including Portrait of Hemingway, have been reprinted in recent years and I suspect more will follow now. Less likely to be reissued is her... Read more

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  • Thirty Years, by John P. Marquand (1954)

    The dust jacket of Marquand’s Thirty Years provides this unimpressive description of the book’s contents: “A collection of stories, articles and essays which have not previously appeared in book form.” Plenty of such collections have been published, but perhaps none other has been so honest in acknowledging the flimsy rationale for its existence. Little, Brown,... Read more

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  • The Strangers Were There: Selected Stories by John Bell Clayton (1957)

    With Charlottesville, Virginia and its statue of General Robert E. Lee in the news, it’s worth taking a moment to note a long-forgotten collection of short stories set in and around the town. John Bell Clayton’s The Strangers Were There (1957), published posthumously, earned mildly reviews and quickly disappeared, but it remains perhaps the most... Read more

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  • The Third Reich of Dreams, by Charlotte Beradt (1968)

    Robert Ley, head of the German Labour Front under Hitler, once said, “The only person in Germany who still leads a private life is the person who sleeps.” In The Third Reich of Dreams, Charlotte Beradt proves that Ley underestimated the power of his own regime over the people’s unconscious. Working quietly and covertly, through... Read more

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  • Four Short Short Stories from Lost Causes by José Leandro Urbina

    Portrait of a Lady In the light of dawn that filtered timidly through the window, she smoothed her dress carefully. One of her fingernails cleaned the others. She moistened her fingertips with saliva and smoothed her eyebrows. As she finished arranging her hair, she heard the jailers coming along the passage- way. In front of... Read more

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  • Selected Stories, by Frances Bellerby (1986)

    The fact that Frances Bellerby’s Selected Stories has been out of print for over thirty years now is literally a case of insult being added to injury. Having damaged her spine while walking along the Lulworth Cliffs on the Dorset coast in 1930, Bellerby spent the remaining forty-five years of her life in pain and... Read more

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  • No More Mimosa, by Ethel Mannin (1943)

    After writing a fairly disparaging piece about Ethel Mannin’s six volumes of memoirs two years ago, I wouldn’t have counted on finding her work on my reading list again. But then I read a thoughtful piece on her 1943 collection, No More Mimosa, originally printed in the December 2013 edition of the Bulletin of the... Read more

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  • Among the Dangs, by George P. Elliott (1961)

    I’ve never found anything written by George P. Elliott entirely satisfying–yet I keep coming back to his work. Considered a rising talent in the 1950s, when his short stories such as “The NRACP” and “Among the Dangs” began appearing in anthologies and to be mentioned as some of the more significant works in then-contemporary American... Read more

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  • The Conspiracy and Other Stories, by Jaan Kross (1995)

    I recently had the chance to travel to Estonia for the first time, to attend a conference in Tallinn. In the spirit of this trip, then, I took along a copy of The Conspiracy, a collection of stories by one of the leading Estonian writers of the last 50 years, Jaan Kross. I was thoroughly... Read more

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  • The Russian-Estonians, from The Conspiracy and Other Stories, by Jaan Kross (1995)

    In a year such as 1947, a Russian-born Estonian was only a zemlyak, a compatriot of mine, to a most problematical degree. Such trusties with their partly, or wholly, unidiomatic phrases, their doubting and distrustful eyes who had, since the war, seeped into the university, from the dean of faculty right down to posts among... Read more

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