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Author birthdays

  • January 10th

    January 10th Americo De Almeida, Jose (Born  January 10, 1887)    JOSE AMERICO DE ALMEIDA was born in 1887 and lived in retirement in Joao Pessoa. His long life was devoted almost entirely to public service and literature. His first novel A Bagacei’ra (Trash, 1928) enjoyed enormous success. The first translation of the book to appear in any language was that of R. L. Scott-Buccleuch into English in 1978 and...

  • January 9th

    January 9th   Karel Capek (Born  January 9, 1890)    Karel Capek (January 9, 1890 - December 25, 1938) was one of the most influential Czech writers of the 20th century. Capek was born in Malé Svatonovice, Bohemia, Austria-Hungary (now Czech Republic). He wrote with intelligence and humour on a wide variety of subjects. His works are known for their interesting and precise descriptions of reality, and...

  • January 8th

    January 8th     Leonardo Sciascia (Born  January 8, 1921)    Leonardo Sciascia (January 8, 1921 – November 20, 1989) was an Italian writer, novelist, essayist, playwright and politician. Some of his works have been made into films, including Open Doors (1990) and Il giorno della civetta (1968). Sciascia was born in Racalmuto, Sicily. In 1935 his family moved to Caltanissetta; here Sciascia studied under...

Neglectedbooks.com

The Neglected Books Page

www.NeglectedBooks.com: Where forgotten books are remembered
  • An Unknown Woman, by Alice Koller (1981)
    “When a woman asks to be alone,” Jessamyn West wrote in Hide and Seek, “… alone, alone, truly alone … a woman feels wicked, unloving, defying God and man alike.” If this is true, then Alice Koller could be considered America’s wickedest woman. Since the day in October 1962 when she packed her few belongings […]
  • “The Palace-Burner,” from Poems by Sarah Morgan Bryan Piatt
    The Palace-Burner [Paris, 1871] A Picture in a Newspaper. She has been burning palaces. “To see The sparks look pretty in the wind!” Well, yes And something more. But women brave as she Leave much for cowards, such as I, to guess. But this is old, so old that everything Is ashes here, the woman […]
  • Hide and Seek: A Continuing Journey, by Jessamyn West (1973)
    The next two books I’m featuring here — Jessamyn West’s Hide and Seek and Alice Koller’s An Unknown Woman: A Journey to Self-Discovery — are set a continent apart but share a strong common bond with that American classic, Thoreau’s Walden. In all three, the writer sets aside time and chooses a location with the […]
  • The Starched Blue Sky of Spain and Other Memoirs, by Josephine Herbst (1991)
    Though one of the most acclaimed of contemporary American novelists when she was writing in the 1930s, Josephine Herbst published just two books after 1941, and her last book, New Green World, a biography of early American naturalist John Bartram, in 1954, fifteen years before she died at the age of 76. By the time […]
  • A Sleepless Summer Night in Bordeaux, from The Journal of Mary Hervey Russell, by Storm Jameson (1945)
    Later, from the window of my bedroom on a corner of the Place des Quinconces, I watched the lights blazing outside the theatre — they should be gas-lamps — and along the quays, those on the farther side of the Garonne reflected in the past, in her present. A dialogue between a piano and a […]
  • Around the Campfire, from The Starched Blue Sky of Spain, by Josephine Herbst (1991)
    Editor’s note: In 1898, Josephine Herbst journeyed from Sioux City, Iowa with her mother and three sisters to visit an uncle in Oregon. Together, the two families traveled by wagon to the coast, where they spent a few weeks camping in the woods alongside a beach, playing, swimming, fishing, and talking at night around the […]
  • The Journal of Mary Hervey Russell, by Storm Jameson (1945)
    I found this intriguing book on the Internet Archive (link), started reading it, and kept on and on, wondering where its meandering and, at times, mirage-like thread would lead. By the time I realized that it didn’t fully qualify as neglected (it’s been reissued, along with over a dozen other titles by Storm Jameson, as […]
  • Contemplating Heaven and Hell, from Adventures of an Ordinary Mind, by Lesley Conger (1963)
    I am sitting here and contemplating Heaven and Hell. Of course at the outset it has to be understood that I don’t believe in either of them. Still, as concepts they are interesting, and what is particularly interesting is that all the minds that have been bent to the task over the centuries have made […]
  • Adventures of an Ordinary Mind, by Lesley Conger (1963)
    Sitting in her kitchen nook, sipping her mid-morning cup of coffee–“the best part of being a housewife” — Lesley Conger decided one day in October 1961 that, “The shape my ambition has taken this year is this: I shall begin to read all the books I should have read by now….” Adventures of an Ordinary […]
  • Nancy Shippen: Her Journal Book, edited by Ethel Armes (1935) – reviewed by Agnes Repplier
    [Editor’s note: Nancy Shippen: Her Journal Book, subtitled, “The International Romance of a Young Lady of Fashion of Colonial Philadelphia with Letters to Her and About Her,” compiled and edited by Ethel Armes, was published in 1935 and is available free on the Internet Archive: Link. The following review, written by the remarkable Philadelphia essayist, […]

Three Percent - Literature in Translation

Three Percent - Article

A resource for international literature from the University of Rochester

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