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Democracy Now!

Democracy Now!

Democracy Now! is an independent daily TV & radio news program, hosted by award-winning journalists Amy Goodman and Juan González. We provide daily global news headlines, in-depth interviews and investigative reports without any advertisements or government funding. Our programming shines a spotlight on corporate and government abuses of power and lifts up the stories of ordinary people working to make change in extraordinary times. Democracy Now! is live weekdays at 8am ET and available 24/7 through our website and podcasts.

Words Without Borders

Words Without Borders

Words Without Borders:The Online Magazine of International Literature
  • The City and the Writer: In Patra with Christos Tsiamis
  • WWB Weekend: Beach Reading
  • “The First Wife: A Tale of Polygamy” by Paulina Chiziane
  • The Borders of Language: An Interview with Etgar Keret
  • From the Translator: On “Beauty, a Terrible Story”
  • WWB Weekend: Ancestors of Pokémon Go
  • The Watchlist: July 2016
  • The City and the Writer: In Valletta, Malta with Nadia Mifsud
  • The Hungry Years in Catalonia: An Interview with Peter Bush about “Black Bread”

New York Review of Books

The New York Review of Books

Recent items from nybooks.com
  • The End of Republicanism?
    After the convention, many Republicans are worried that Trumpism does not respect the prudent, cautious, free-market conservatism they value. Trump is turning his back on decades of Republican Party doctrine and, for millennials especially, making...
  • Party of Rage
    The strategy and tone that lay behind this week’s Republican convention in Cleveland, and that have lain behind Donald Trump’s campaign from its outset, reflect a strain that has existed in the Republican Party for nearly fifty years. That is, to...
  • France at War
    Days after the Nice attacks, French politics has shifted toward militarism, xenophobia, and the all-powerful state. France is hurtling toward a presidential election that will bring more hostility, fear, and division, and be fought against the...
  • ‘What I Couldn’t Say Myself’
    Danny Lyon has spent much of his career taking intimate photographs of marginal, working-class, and outlaw communities. Many of the most striking pictures in the Whitney Museum’s new survey, “Danny Lyon: Message to the Future," come from these...
  • Reality TV in Cleveland
    Trump’s candidacy rests on his experience as a business leader, on the notion that he is the CEO ready to run America, Inc. What he has demonstrated so far at the Republican convention in Cleveland is not deviation from an ideological norm, but...
  • Fences: A Brexit Diary
    A referendum magnifies the worst aspects of an already imperfect system—democracy—channeling a dazzlingly wide variety of issues through a very narrow gate. It has the appearance of intensification—Ultimate democracy! Thumbs up or thumbs down!—but...
  • ISIS: The Durability of Chaos
    Rather than reflecting a movement in decline, the Nice attack may be best understood as a recalibration of long-endorsed tactics in the service of an overriding strategy of world revolution. Even if ISIS loses all of its territory in Syria and...
  • The Creepy World of Bruce Conner
    Bruce Conner's enormously influential follow-up to A Movie, Cosmic Ray (1962) was the original underground blockbuster—a frantic found-footage-plus-gyrating-naked-woman montage set to Ray Charles's ecstatic What'd I Say....
  • A Bad Thing in Brooklyn
    Without preaching or making obvious points, Sebastián Silva’s excellent film Nasty Baby, about a gentrifying neighborhood of Brooklyn, reminds us: how many of our daily interactions are shaped by race and class, how well we understand or...

Neglectedbooks.com

The Neglected Books Page

www.NeglectedBooks.com: Where forgotten books are remembered
  • Teetgen’s Teas, from Dorothy Richardson’s Pilgrimage

    Three times in the course of Dorothy Richardson’s “novel in chapters,” Pilgrimage, a tea shop in a small and unnamed London street spurs an intense connection in the subconsciousness of her protagonist and fictional counterpart, Miriam Henderson. The first occurs in The Tunnel, the fourth book of the series and the first in which Miriam... Read more

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  • My Literary Life, by Mrs. Elizabeth Lynn Linton (1899)

    Between John Sutherland’s wonderful encyclopedia, The Stanford Companion to Victorian Fiction, and the Internet Archive, I can lose hours wandering through the three-volumed forest of English 19th century fiction, particularly in the last year that written by women. It can be soul-leeching, though. There is something relentlessly earnest and deliberate in so much English fiction... Read more

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  • Fun Facts from A World of Wonders, edited by Albany Poyntz (Catherine Gore) (1845)

    Credulity is unfortunately a weakness common to the human race; and a tendency to exaggeration is scarcely less universal. Between the two failings, monstrous stories obtain circulation; and as it is easier to assent than examine, the world becomes overrun with en’ors and prejudices. A curious anecdote related from mouth to mouth, becomes exaggerated into... Read more

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  • Gems from the Internet Archives: Women’s Autobiographies

    Not having access to a major library, I often indulge my love of browsing in the Internet Archive. I’ll admit that it often requires much sifting through extraneous material to locate the occasional gem, but even after ten years I’m surprised at what I manage to find. Here, for example, is a selection of some... Read more

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  • A Room of Your Own, from The World of Charmian Clift

    At that moment a sports car roared up outside the block of flats, and another herd of young swept in as boisterously as an equinoctial gale to sweep my daughter off to some jollity or other, and suddenly the living-room (which is the only place I can put my desk) was seething with ebullience, and... Read more

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  • Men of Capital, by Catherine Gore (1846)

    I’ve had Catherine Gore on my list long before I started focusing on the works of women writers in the last two years. Gore was perhaps the most prolific authors of Regency and early Victorian era genre known as the silver fork or “fashionable” novel. As Tamara Wagner describes the silver fork novel on Victorianweb.org,... Read more

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  • The World of Charmian Clift (1970)

    Neglect is a relative term, particularly when you look at writers from a global perspective. Charmian Clift is a good example. In the U.S., she gained slight notice for her two books about life on a Greek island back in the 1950s, disappeared after that, and is utterly unknown today. In Australia, she and her... Read more

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  • Carobeth Laird, First Published at Age 80

    “Never before have I heard of an exiting new literary talent bursting forth at the age of 80. But here, I am convinced, we have one,” Tom Wolfe in Harper’s Bookletter in 1975. He was remarking upon the publication of Carobeth Laird’s first book, a memoir of her marriage to anthropologist John Peabody Harrington, Encounter... Read more

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  • On Pilgrimage: a Dialogue with Kate Macdonald

    About the time I was well into reading through Dorothy Richardson’s Pilgrimage a couple of months ago, I discovered that Kate Macdonald, Visiting Fellow at the Department of English Literature at the University of Reading and fellow Brussels expat, was also working through the series and posting about it on her blog. So I asked... Read more

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  • An Interview with Veronica Makowsky about Isa Glenn

    A few months ago, I was contacted by Professor Veronica Makowsky of the University of Connecticut, who is researching the life and work of Isa Glenn, a forgotten woman writer of the 1920s and 1930s whose novel Transport I reviewed here some years ago. Dr. Makowsky is something of an expert on neglected women writers,... Read more

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