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Democracy Now!

Democracy Now!

22 January 2019

Democracy Now! is an independent daily TV & radio news program, hosted by award-winning journalists Amy Goodman and Juan González. We provide daily global news headlines, in-depth interviews and investigative reports without any advertisements or government funding. Our programming shines a spotlight on corporate and government abuses of power and lifts up the stories of ordinary people working to make change in extraordinary times. Democracy Now! is live weekdays at 8am ET and available 24/7 through our website and podcasts.

Words Without Borders

Words Without Borders

22 January 2019

Words Without Borders:The Online Magazine of International Literature

New York Review of Books

The New York Review of Books

22 January 2019

Recent items from nybooks.com
  • Rapping with Fanon
    Rocé’s anthology album carries more than a whiff of radical chic nostalgia, which he does little to conceal when he describes the 1960s and 1970s as “an epoch of struggles, of possibility.” Yet Par les damné.e.s de la terre is an...
  • Can a Translation Be a Masterpiece, Too?
    A translation can indeed be creative and “important,” but it is the creativity of astute accommodation and damage limitation, the “importance” of allowing as much as possible of that original to happen in the translator’s culture. To imagine,...
  • Notes from Underground
    The cursory familiarity that many people today have with Nelson Mandela’s story of moral courage and triumph has produced a near-universal secular beatification. Mandela enjoys an image akin to that of Martin Luther King Jr. The late South African...
  • Poons v. Koons: The Art of ‘The Price of Everything’
    The quandary at the heart of The Price of Everything, the art world documentary recently acquired by HBO, is summed up in a scene with the great German artist Gerhard Richter. Gesturing to one of his own paintings, Richter explains, “It’s...
  • Listening to Women’s Bodies
    Between hiding what we’re told is embarrassing and presenting ourselves to the world to be appraised, women’s relationships to our bodies can be complex, even brutal. As the host of Bodies podcast Allison Behringer reminds us in one...
  • The Twisting Nature of Love
    When I was a child there was always a nanny. My parents were broke more often than not—breakfast and supper might frequently be a bread roll and black coffee—but there was always a nanny, and no matter how sporadically we paid her, she never left:...
  • ‘Reeducating’ Xinjiang’s Muslims
    In a courtroom in Zharkent, Kazakhstan, in July 2018, a former kindergarten principal named Sayragul Sauytbay calmly described what Chinese officials continue to deny: a vast new gulag of “de-extremification training centers” has been created for...
  • Shooting Down A Legend
    To the Editors: Alan Hollinghurst repeats the popular legend that Lord Arran, who sponsored in the British Parliament the law that partially decriminalized male homosexuality in 1967, did so because his brother, the translator Paul Sudley,...
  • Novels as History
    To the Editors: Recently, Professor Robert Paxton did me the honor of writing a wide-ranging review of The Order of the Day, ending with a brutal conclusion. Understandably, the publication of my book in a great number of countries...

Neglectedbooks.com

The Neglected Books Page

22 January 2019

www.NeglectedBooks.com: Where forgotten books are remembered
  • Quiet Street, by Michael Ossorgin [Mikhail Osorgin] (1930)

    I’ve been saving Mikhail Osorgin’s novel, Quiet Street, for a quiet break. There is something about a good, thick Russian book — things like Anna Karenina, Life and Fate, or Konstantin Paustovsky’s autobiography — that demand you set aside distractions and carve out hours to let it take over your life, and I could tell... Read

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  • Theme with Variations, by G. E. Trevelyan (1938)

    “Samuel Smith was the best part of thirty before anyone told him he was a wage-slave.” With opening sentence of Theme with Variations, G. E. Trevelyan tells her readers they’re not in typical British women’s middlebrow territory anymore. This is not a book about tea parties or sitting rooms: this is book simmering with anger... Read

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  • Ragged Regiment, by George Marion (1981)

    Since the Fifties, there have been plenty of junk or ‘Pulp’ novels depicting the Second World War from American and, to a lesser degree, British & Australian authors. (Yes, even Australia had pulp war novelists. Owen Gibson was one writer who, during the Fifties, churned out about 25 slim novels about Aussies in WW2. Totally... Read more

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  • A Family Failure, by Renate Rasp (1970)

    Kuno, the son in Renate Rasp’s novel, A Family Failure, wishes he could be as lucky as Gregor Samsa. When Gregor was transformed into a monstrous cockroach, at least his family had the decency to reject him. Kuno’s family — specifically his stepfather (who prefers to be referred to as “Uncle Felix”) — wants to... Read more

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  • Carrington: A Novel of the West, by Michael Straight (1960)

    For an obscure novelist, Michael Whitney Straight (1916- 2004) had an extraordinary life and career. A member of a distinguished family, his maternal grandfather was William C. Whitney, Secretary of the US Navy in the late 1800s, his mother was Dorothy Whitney, the famous philanthropist and his father William (who died of Spanish Flu in... Read

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  • Stunning Portraits from Hungary, by Adrian and Marianne Stokes (1909)

    My wife and I had the chance to spend a few days in Budapest recently, our first visit to Hungary. One afternoon, we visited the M?csarnok Kunsthalle museum, which includes an exhibit of works related to the discovery of Hungarian folk art and lore by artists, musicians, and writers in the early part of the... Read more

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  • New Years, 1948 (Boston: Washington and Dover Streets), from Hello, Darkness, by L. E. Sissman (1978)

    Three Stanzas from “New Years, 1948 TWO ‘“Well, happy birthday,” Sally Sayward says, Endowing me invisibly with bays, Each leaf to mark a year. “Now, go away,” She tells me, twenty, but, near-man, I stay To press my case with passive rhetoric Where deeds are needed. Nonetheless, her quick Rejection is retracted. By degrees, I... ...

  • Island in Moonlight, by Kathleen Sully (1970)

    With this, I reach the end of this year’s longest exploration, that into the oeuvre of the utterly forgotten novelist, Kathleen Sully. There is one more of her 17 novels I haven’t read, but the one copy of Not Tonight that was available five months ago has since been snatched up. You have to check... Read more

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  • Lou Gehrig’s Last Christmas, from Christmas with Ed Sullivan (1959)

    Dear Ed, Lou died on June 2, 1941. He was unmercifully young — only thirty-eight. Our last Christmas together was in 1940, and to keep Lou occupied I held open house at our home in Riverdale, as I frequently did that last year of his life. He was not bedridden at the time, and he... Read more

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  • Dear Wolf, by Kathleen Sully (1967)

    Nob Caldar, the wolf in Kathleen Sully’s Dear Wolf, could be the hero of a 1950s R&B song — the Dominoes’s “Sixty Minute Man” or anything by Bo Diddley (“A young girl’s wish and an old woman’s dream”). He’s the local lovin’ man, who manages to bed at least a dozen different women in the... Read more

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